2013

On 07 June 2013 at 11:00

Aperçu de la bijouterie hellénistique et romaine du Proche-Orient, à partir de pièces rares ou inédites

Dr. Cyril Thiaudière & Dr. Corinne Besson

Jewellery produced during the Hellenistic and Roman times, from around the 4th century BC to the 4th century AD, is rich in influences, creativity and innovation, whether on a stylistical, typological or a technical level.  Retracing its evolution, in the extremely particular frame of the Middle East is a challenge and therefore we pay particular attention to its most significant and unexpected  aspects, thanks to a selection of almost unknown or even unprecedented pieces of jewellery and precious metalwork. We focus on the production of Egypt, starting with «Ptolemaic jewellery», where we will demonstrate that it is not just a meaningless form of expression. A jewellery, like the one of the Levantine coast, possesses its own specificities in form and sometimes in spirit; in a word, its own identity. This is an opportunity to understand that the production of  late antiquity is by no means uniform but multidimensional, and this in more than one aspect, whether it be in its origins or its destination.

(Lecture in French)

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Where

Cercle de Lorraine

When

On 07 June 2013 at 11:00

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Who

Dr. Cyril Thiaudière & Dr. Corinne Besson

Dr. Cyril Thiaudière holds a Degree in Ancient History and Archaeology and is a former scholar of the Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale. Author of a thesis about the study of technical and typological gold jewelry from Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt (Poitiers –Limoges 2005). Associate researcher at the research group HISTARA, EA 4115: “Art history, archeology and history of representations of Europe”, of the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Sorbonne, Paris.

Dr Corinne Besson (France), holds a Degree in jewelry and a Ph.D. in Art History and Archeology. Former scholar of the Ministry of National Education Research and Technology. Author of a thesis about the study of technical and typological gold jewelry from Roman Gaul (Poitiers – Paris IV/Sorbonne 2007). Associate researcher at the team “Technical-Commercial Production and Consumption” of the UMR 5140 of the Archaeology of Mediterranean societies from the University of Lattes-Montpellier/CNRS.

http://www.aurumantiquum.com